Labs and Facilities

 Labs and Facilities

A. Offices, Classrooms and Laboratories

The Frank H. Dotterweich College of Engineering occupies four separate buildings with a combined floor space of almost 130,000 square feet.  This space includes 80,400 square feet Engineering Building that became operational in August 2001. This building has proven to be an exceptional teaching facility.

A.1 Offices (Administrative, Faculty, Clerical, Teaching Assistants)

The primary ME administrative spaces include 923 square feet for offices and a 154 square foot workroom, both located on the third floor of the main engineering building and shared with the Chemical and Electrical engineering departments. 

The department chair has a 200 square foot office off of the main administrative office.  Faculty offices, also located on the third floor, are ~140 square feet each.  Additionally, there is a 776 square foot Faculty Lounge with refrigerator, two microwaves, sink, and vending machines.  There is an outdoor patio/balcony outside the Faculty Lounge. There is also a 100 square foot instructor office in the McNeil.

The computer system administrator has a 156 square foot office with an adjoining 88 square foot room for the server and storage.  Additionally, there is a 415 square foot room supporting the multimedia and TTVN needs of classrooms 136 and 138.

The 1200 square foot machine shop is located in the McNeil Engineering Lab Building.  The equipment in the machine shop is listed with the lab equipment in Appendix C.

A.2 Classrooms

The Frank H. Dotterweich College of Engineering provides excellent classrooms in the main engineering and McNeil buildings. There are seventeen classrooms available with a combined space of over 13,000 square feet, each seating between 15 and 87 students.  All classrooms provide multimedia support including computers, projectors, and high speed internet connections.  Five of the classrooms have computers for use by the students, complete with internet access and a complete complement of software.    

The main engineering building also has a 725 square feet for Javelina Engineering Student Success Center (JESSC) with computers with internet access and software.

Additionally, there is a 402 square feet faculty lounge with refrigerator, microwave, sink, and vending machines. Table 7-1 is a list of classroom space used by the ME Department.

 

 

 

 

Table 7-1 Summary of classroom space used by the ME Department

Building and

Room Number

Maximum Seating

Building and

Room Number

Maximum Seating

McNeil 302

24

ENGC 109

87

McNeil 308

59

ENGC 112

24

Gross Hall  108

40

ENGC 113

39

Gross Hall  109

40

ENGC 136

45

Gross Hall  110

44

ENGC 138

42

Gross Hall  111

33

ENGC 218

44

ENGC 104

40

ENGC 207

15

ENGC 106

36

ENGC 275

64

ENGC 107

32

 

 

Additionally, all other classrooms on campus are available as needed to accommodate larger classes and more sections.

A.3 Laboratories

The ME Department has eight laboratories--Engineering Measurements, Materials Science, Fluids/Thermal, Manufacturing Processes, Composites, Robotics, Controls, Automation & Simulation, and a machine shop.  All labs in addition to the courses they are tied with, also support Senior Design (MEEN 4263 & 64) work as well as ongoing research.  These labs are located in Engineering Complex (EC), Dotterweich (Dott), and gross Hall.

These labs are summarized in Table 7-2. 

 

Table 7-2 MEIE Laboratories

Laboratory Name

Room #

Courses & Instructor

Equipment

Engineering Measurements

McNeil 301

MEEN 2146 – Grady Isensee

MEEN 4263/4264 – Larry Peel

Thermocouples, strain gauges, pressure transducers, pressure gauges, LVDT’s, load cells, data acquisition systems, viscosity and flow measurements

Materials Science

Dott 208

MEEN 3145 – Mohammad Hossain

MEEN 4385 – Larry Peel

MEEN 4263/4264 – Larry Peel

A universal testing machine, impact test machine, fatigue (both reverse bending and torsional) testing, hardness testing, creep testing, polishing stations, and a metallurgical microscope

Fluids/Thermal

Dott 207a

MEEN 4131- Sangsoo Lee

Thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics equipment are available including 2 wind tunnels and demonstration equipment for heat exchangers, conduction heat transfer, thermal radiation, and convection heat transfer.

Composites Fabrication

Dott 207b

MEEN 4385 – Larry Peel

MEEN 3349 – Larry Peel

MEEN 4263/4264 – Larry Peel

A three-axis Entec-CMC filament winder, a 33 ft3 Grieve curing oven, a large self-healing cutting table with a rack, an air compressor, vacuum pump, and a heated platen press.  A portable OROS 4 channel digital data acquisition system, OROS software, an instrumented hammer, several accelerometers, and a “Visual Modal” software package, and a new multi-material Stratasys Connex 500 3d printer.  It is intended to move the other 3D printers to this lab.

Manufacturing Processes

EC 219

MEEN 3349 – Larry Peel

MEEN 4385 – Larry Peel

MEEN 4263/4264 – Larry Peel

A new large Tormach CNC mill, a smaller desktop CNC mill, several new 3D printers, and several computer workstations.  Another new multi-material 3D printer is located in Dott 207b. A new micro-milling machine will be located in this lab.

Robotics

EC 249

MEEN 4355 – Selahattin Ozcelik

MEEN 4344 – Selahattin Ozcelik

EEEN 4360, MEEN 4263/4264 – Larry Peel

The lab has two Staubli RX90 6-DOF robots, a MRCP Mobile Robot, a Kyphera Mobile Robot, and five computers.

Controls

EC 250

MEEN 4355 – Selahattin Ozcelik

MEEN 4344 – Selahattin Ozcelik

EEEN 4360,

MEEN 4263/4264 – Larry Peel

The lab has a heat Flow chamber, Inverted Pendulum, five Quanser Data Acquisition Boards, a Servo Motor Setup, a Torsional Plant Setup, an Oscilloscope, a National Instruments Elvis Station, a Water Level Control Setup, a Light Source Following Antenna System, a Sun Workstation For Graphics, and five additional computers complete with Wincon DAQ Software.

Advanced Simulation and Automation

Laboratories

Gross 115

MEEN 5303/ 5305/ 3360 - Yahia M. Al-Smadi

Four PLC workstations and four computer workstations, equipped with biomechanical software, academic version of STAR-CCM+ v10.04.STAR-CCM+

 

The Engineering Measurements Lab supports the MEEN 2146 Engineering Measurements course.  Thermocouples, strain gauges, pressure transducers, pressure gauges, LVDT’s, load cells, data acquisition systems, viscosity and flow measurements and other related equipment are available.  The lab manager for the Engineering Measurements lab is Grady Isensee. The lab has been updated and since 2009, and additional new NI Elvis Prototyping Boards, new Labview Software, and 5 new computers have been ordered. The lab is located in room 301 of the McNeil building and includes 1000 square feet. 

Engineering Measurement Lab 2

Figure 7-1 Engineering Measurements Lab

 34

Figure 7-2 Flow/Pressure Drop (Left) and Mechanical Systems (Right) Experiment

 

Figure 7-3 Air Velocity (left) and Pneumatic Systems (right) Experiment

 

Figure 7-4 Viscosity (left) and Pressure Calibration (right) Experiment

The Materials Science Lab supports MEEN 3145 Materials Science Laboratory course.  Materials testing equipment such as the universal testing machine, impact test machine, fatigue (both reverse bending and torsional) testing, hardness testing, creep testing, polishing stations, and a metallurgical microscope are available.  The lab manager for the Materials Science lab is a newly hired professor, Dr. Mohammad Hossain. The lab is located in room 208 of the Dotterweich building and includes 1036 square feet.

 

  

Figure 7-5 New MTS Universal Testing Machine (Left) and Rockwell Hardness Tester (Right)

 

Figure 7-6 Nikon Microscope (Left) and Creep Apparatus (Right)

 

Figure 7-7 Furnace (Left) and Speed Quench Unit (Right)

 

Figure 7-8 Fatigue Test Machine (Left) and Eddy Current Instrument (Right)

 

The Fluids/Thermal lab supports MEEN 4131 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory course.  Thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics equipment are available including a wind tunnel and demonstration equipment for heat exchangers, conduction heat transfer, thermal radiation, and convection heat transfer. The thermal and fluid laboratory is located in room 207 (12.9 m ´ 7.7 m) in the Dotterwich College. The thermal and fluid Lab is managed by Dr. Lee. It currently holds 2 wind tunnels, 6- pass heat exchanger, convective heat transfer, hydraulic system, and thermal radiation demonstrators including a recently upgraded wind tunnel and a convective heat transfer demonstrator. The lab equipment is significantly used by undergraduate students for Mechanical Engineering Laboratory (MEEN 4131) and currently Dr. Lee is working on developing sustainable energy systems using nano/micro technologies for system and component levels.

a. Wind Tunnels: The wind tunnel (Hampden Engineering, model H-6910) has been designed to provide the fundamental air flow facilities necessary to perform any experiments to test fluid flow over a surface or check the aero dynamicity of different objects.

b. Convection Heat Transfer Demonstrators: The Laboratory currently holds 2 convection experiment setups (Hampden Engineering, model H-6860) and one is recently updated. These setups are to demonstrate the phenomenon of forced and natural convection heat transfer. The setups come along with a variety of shapes and sizes of cylinder and flat plate to show the effect of surface area and geometries of heating elements on convection heat transfer performances. Using these experiment setups, several convective heat transfer tests can be conducted including forced convection heat transfer experiments over a cylinder and a flat plate and natural convection over the vertical plate.

c. Heat Exchanger Apparatus: The heat exchanger apparatus (Hampden Engineering, model H-6878) is for the obtaining effectiveness of various kinds of heat exchangers by exchange heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat transfer performances of several types of heat exchangers can be evaluated and compared and the key parameter to improver effectiveness can be observed using the test setup. 

d. Hydraulic System Demonstrators: The lab has hydraulic system (Gunt, HM150) test setups for a Venturi meter (Gunt, HM150.13) and a piping system (Gunt, HM150.11). The Venturi meter is used to measure a flow rate and the piping system is used to demonstrate several friction losses in a piping system including pressure losses due to various types of bends, extractions, and expansions. These experiment setups are used for understanding the fundamentals of pressure losses of viscous fluids in a piping system and measuring flow rate.

e. Thermal Conduction Demonstrators: Thermal conduction demonstrator (Hampden Engineering, model H-6860) is used for obtaining thermal conductivities of various types of metals in a single and/or stacked with uniform and tapered cylinders. In addition, it has a furnace to the measure time constants of various materials when heated.

 

 

Figure 7-9 Small Wind Tunnel (Left) and Large Wind Tunnel (Right)

 

 

Figure 7-10 Convection Heat Transfer Demonstrator (Left) and Heat Exchanger Demonstrator (Right)

 

 

Figure 7-11 Hydraulic System Demonstrator: Venturi Meter (Left) and Piping System (Right)

 

Figure 7-12 Thermal Conduction Heat Transfer Demonstrator

 

The Manufacturing Processes Lab supports MEEN 3349 Fundamentals of Manufacturing Processes course and the MEEN 4385 Manufacturing of Composites course.  This lab is used for lecturing, demonstration, and hands-on work.  The Manufacturing Lab is in TAMUK’s Engineering Complex building Room 219.  The lab manager for the Manufacturing Processes Lab is Dr. Peel. The lab includes 723 square feet of floor space, has compressed air, 110 and 220 VAC power. The lab has equipment that is used to fabricate components, molds and patterns for composites research, compliant mechanisms and smart structures. This lab includes a Dimension (Stratasys) UprintPlus FDM-style 3D printer, a single-material Objet30 Polyjet-type 3D Printer, a 3 axis stand-alone Tormach CNC mill, a desktop lathe, and several computer workstations.  There are several computer workstations in the lab for data transfer and numerical analyses.  A laboratory-scale polymer extruder is currently under fabrication and will make FDM filament for 3D Printing.

a. uPrint Plus 3D Printer (by Stratasys): Fused deposition molding (FDM) is used for the uPrint Plus 3D Printer.  The model material is ABS thermoplastic available in multiple colors.  The build size of this 3D printer is 203 x 203 x 152 mm (8 x 8 x 6 in) and its layer thickness is 0.254 mm (0.010 in).  The weight of the 3D printer is 94 kg (206 lbs).   The uPrint 3D Printer is compact enough to fit on a desktop, has a simple hassle-free setup and operation, and is affordable for most users.

b. Objet30 Desktop 3D Printer (By Objet, which has now merged with Stratasys): Inkjet 3D printing is used for Objet30 Desktop 3D Printer.  Acrylic-based photopolymer materials are used for building the models.  Each photopolymer layer in a 3D model is cured by UV light immediately after it is jetted, producing a fully cured 3D model that can be handled and used immediately, without post-curing.  The build size of this 3D printer is 294 x 192.7 x 148.6 mm (11.58 x 7.58 x 5.85 in) and its layer thickness is 0.028 mm (0.0011 in).  The printing resolution is 600 x 600 x 900 dpi (XYZ).  There is a range of 5 printing materials (VeroWhitePlus, VeroBlue, VeroBlack, VeroGray, and DurusWhite) with different levels of physical and mechanical properties (strength and flexibility) in a choice of 4 colors (White, Blue, Black, and Gray).  The Objet30 Desktop 3D Printer is an affordable office-friendly desktop system capable of printing high-quality, finely detailed models in different materials and colors.  Models produced by Objet30 can be painted, drilled, machined, used as a mold, or used for vacuum forming.  Models can also have features of small moving parts and thin walls.

 

Figure 7-13 Tormach CNC Lathe

Figure 7-14 UprintPlus FDM-style 3DPrinter (Left) and Objet30 Inkjet-style 3D Printer (Right)

The Composites Fabrication Lab also supports MEEN 3349 Fundamentals of Manufacturing Processes course and MEEN 4385 Manufacturing of Composites course.  The laboratory provides advanced composites fabrication capabilities that are not found elsewhere in south Texas, and is one of the better equipped university composites fabrication labs in Texas.  The lab has a three-axis Entec-CMC filament winder, a 33 cubic foot capacity Grieve curing oven, a large self-healing cutting table, a rack for rolls of carbon and fiberglass cloth, an air compressor, vacuum pump, and the latest addition to the lab, a heated platen press from Carver featuring two 12”x12” platens that can be heated up to 450 Fº, a stroke of 5.5 inches, and 20 tons clamping force.  Vibration testing is conducted using a portable OROS 4 channel digital data acquisition system, OROS software, an instrumented hammer, several accelerometers, and a “Visual Modal” software package installed on a laptop that allows students to extract natural frequencies and damping values.  The latest addition to the lab, installed in Spring 2014 is a multi-material Stratasys Connex 500 3d printer.  The lab manager for the Composites lab is Dr. Larry Peel. The lab is located in room 207B of the Dotterweich building and includes 991 square feet.

 

Figure 7-15 Entec-CMC 3 Axis Filament Winder.

 

The three-axis Entec-CMC filament winder has a fiber tensioner with wet- and dry-winding of parts up to 8 feet in length and 24 inches in diameter.  The winder is linked to a computer workstation where “FibergrafiX Plus” is used to create winding patterns. 

 

Figure 7-16 Cutting Table (Left) and Vacuum Pump for Vacuum Bagging (Right)

 

The lab has a 33-cubic foot capacity Grieve curing oven that will cure large parts up to 400°F.  This oven has ports built into it so that vacuum bags and resin infusion equipment can be used inside the oven.

 

Figure 7-17  A-33 Cubic Foot Oven (Left) and Vibration Testing Equipment (Right)

Vibration testing is conducted using a portable OROS 4 channel digital data acquisition system, OROS software, an instrumented hammer, several accelerometers, and a “Visual Modal” software package installed on a laptop that allows students to extract natural frequencies and damping values.

 

Figure 7-18 Heated Platen Press

 

A very useful addition to the lab, is a heated platen press from Carver.  It has two 12”x12” platens that can be heated up to 450 Fº, with a stroke of 5.5 inches, and can apply 20 tons clamping force.  The press can be used to mold plastic and composite parts.

Flammable liquids are stored in an OSHA-approved cabinet, in a large storage room with shelves and cabinets for student projects.

 

Figure 7-19 Stratasys CONNEX 500 Multi-Material 3D Printer, installed Spring 2014.

 

The Robotics Lab supports the MEEN 4355 Robotics and Automation course, as well as graduate courses and graduate research.  The lab has two Staubli RX90 6-DOF robots, a MRCP Mobile Robot, a Kyphera Mobile Robot, and five computers.  The lab manager for the Robotics lab is Dr. Ozcelik. The lab is located in room 249 of the main engineering building and includes 700 square feet.

Figure 7-20 Staubli Robots (Left), Mobile Robot (Middle), and Quadracopter (Right)

The Controls lab supports the MEEN4344 Control of Systems course, as well as graduate courses and graduate research.  The lab has a heat Flow chamber, Inverted Pendulum, five Quanser Data Acquisition Boards, a Servo Motor Setup, a Torsional Plant Setup, an Oscilloscope, a National Instruments Elvis Station, a Water Level Control Setup, a Light Source Following Antenna System, a Sun Workstation For Graphics, five additional computers complete with Wincon DAQ Software.  The lab manager for the Controls lab is Dr. Ozcelik. The lab is located in room 250 of the main engineering building and includes 636 square feet.

 

Figure 7-21 Water Level Control (Left) and Motor Control (Right) Experiments

 

Figure 7-23 Control Simulations (Top) and Robotic Arm Simulation (Bottom) Workstations

 

The Sustainability and Simulation Laboratory (SSL) is directed by Drs. Hua Li and Kai Jin with major location in room 204 of the Dotterweich Hall building. The lab has a Dell Precision T7600 Tower Workstation, 2 HP Proliant Servers, 12 HP mobile workstations, 5 HP Elitebook Tablet PCs, a Fisher Scientific Isotemp Model 281A Vacuum Oven, a Misonix Sonicator 4000 Homogenizer, a Elmo P30HD Document Camera with wireless Pen Tablet, and a 24” Smart Podium. The lab also has Minitab 16 and Arena Professional Edition software. With above equipment and software, the lab has enough capacity to conduct optimization and simulation work, as well as make online course materials.

The Automation & Simulation Lab supports the MEEN 3360 Engineering Design and Simulations course, MEEN 5303 Automation Systems Course, and MEEN5305 Graduate Research Project. The lab manager for this automation and PLC lab is Dr. Al-Smadi. The lab is located at Industrial Technology Building room 115 and includes 950 square feet. This lab is used for lecturing, demonstration, and hands-on work on the Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). The lab includes four PLC workstations and four computer workstations. Space and requirements for each PLC workstation is enough for up to five students. 

Figure 7-22 Computer (Left) and PLC Workstations (Right)

Figure 7-23 Computer Work Stations

Figure 7-24 AnyBody Workstation

 

A.4 MEIE Machine Shop

The Mechanical Engineering Department of TAMUK has a well-equipped machine shop and a full-time machinist. The machine shop is located in room 301 within the McNeil Building.  Equipment includes several lathes, end mills, table saws, band saws, drill presses, welding machines, chop saws, automated flat grinder, and other special-purpose tools. The machine shop and the machinist are available for full use by students and faculty.  Many Senior Design teams fabricate items in the machine shop, with the support of Carlos Hinojosa, machinist.  The machine shop was upgraded with a new metal-cutting horizontal band saw and a high temperature oven for heat treatments in 2014.

 

B. Computing Resources

The Texas A&M University-Kingsville provides resources and services to faculty, staff, students and guests. The university has high speed data communications, with wireless access available over much of the campus. All classrooms within the college have teaching stations with computer-based instructional technology including LED projectors.  Two of the classrooms have back-projection screens with full multimedia and TTVN (the wide area data and interactive communications network that serves the campuses and agencies of the Texas A&M System) capability, allowing students to virtually attend classes from remote campuses.  Many classrooms serve double-duty as computer labs, allowing students access to a full range of engineering computational and graphics tools.  These services are supported through the iTech department dedicated to providing services necessary to acquire, install, maintain, develop and operate the Computing, Telecommunication and Distance Learning systems of Texas A&M University-Kingsville (TAMUK) with microcomputer services, network services, telecom, administrative support, help desk, and distance learning & instructional technology support.

B.1 Computing Resources, Hardware and Software Used For Instruction

The Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department at the Texas A&M University-Kingsville (MEIE TAMUK) has excellent analysis and simulation capabilities through a variety of well-proven software packages. Matlab, Visual Basic, C++, and Fortran are used by all faculty. AutoCAD is used for 2D drawing and SolidWorks is for designing 3D dimensional objects, and for basic stress, fluid and thermal analysis.  For manufacturing processes (CNC), Sprutcam, and MasterCAM for SolidWorks are available. The simulation packages ANSYS and AutoDesk Nastran In-CAD are available for nonlinear static, dynamic, and thermal finite element analyses. For computational fluid dynamics, SolidWorks Flow is used for quick and fast predictions for of fluid behaviors and ANSYS FLUENT is used for higher precision results. The EES (Engineering Equation Solver) package is used for thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer to obtain thermal and fluid properties with handling sets of equations and variables at the same time.

The ME department is home for an NSF funded supercomputing center, the High Performance Computing Cluster.  Located in the 602 square feet room 271 of the main Engineering Complex building, it consists of forty rack-mounted nodes.  Each node has two 3 GHz Xeon Dual-Core Processors, 2GB of RAM, and an 80 GB hard drive.  The system operates using Red Hat Linux and has an additional 15 TB of hard drive storage space.  The system can be accessed by anyone with an account remotely using Putty software.  Both faculty and students (with faculty OK) can have accounts.

TAMUK, along with the College of Engineering has moved away from standalone PC’s to a Virtual Desktop Interface (VDI). A Thin Client is used to access images specific to each department.  VDI Server is consisted Eight Dell PowerEdge R730 servers. Each server has dual Xeon E5-2670 processors with 12 cores per processor and configured with 768 GB of RAM. The eight systems are attached to a 24.8 TB Cisco SSD Flash Drive Storage Array.

Table 7-3 is a list of classrooms/computer labs used by the college and Table 7-4 is a partial list of software available on the student workstations.

 

Table 7-3.  Summary of Computer Labs within the College of Engineering.

Building and

Room Number

Number of Student Computer Stations

Building and

Room Number

Number of Student Computer Stations

McNeil 308

20

Sam Fore Hall 111

24

McNeil 310

33

Sam Fore Hall 112

36

ENGC 103

14

Rhode Hall 244

24

ENGC 104

25

Kleberg AG 141

28

ENGC 106

25

Eckhart Hall 153

24

ENGC 218

23

Eckhart Hall 253

24

ENGC 240

20

Manning Hall 212

15

ENGC 275

60

SPEC Room 121

8

Gross Hall 108

36

MSUB Hallway

5

Gross Hall 109

36

Jernigan Library

81

 

 

Business Administration 107

42

ENGC: Engineering Complex

 

Table 7-4 Listing of Software Accessible in Engineering Classrooms/Labs.

Location

Software

All classroom and computer lab PC’s

MATLAB 2014B

AutoCAD 2014

Solidworks 2014 SP5

Ansys 15.07

Microsoft Visual Studio Express 2013

Microsoft Office 2010

Materials Science Lab

ExceLINX datalogging software

Online ¾  used with MEEN3344 Materials Science course

WileyPlus online software

Manufacturing Processes Lab

Flash-Cut CNC

Composites Lab

FibergrafiX Plus

Controls Lab

Wincon DAQ Software

Advance Automation and Simulation Lab

AnyBody, STAR-CCM+ v10.04.STAR-CCM+

C. Guidance

The instructional laboratories are taught by lab managers and/or teaching assistants who are trained on the equipment and safety procedures that are used in the classroom. In general, the lab managers trains the laboratory teaching assistants on the use of the instructional equipment, and the lab managers and teaching assistants instruct the students.

During the training sessions, safety topics are addressed. The safety topics include eye protection, appropriate attire, burn potentials, location and how to use eye washing stations, MSDS information location, and emergency preparedness. The students are guided on safety through demonstration by the lab mangers and teaching assistants during the lab class period.

Starting from July 24, 2014 by the Office of Responsibility set a Texas A&M University-Kingsville Standard Administrative Procedures.

  • Each department who has students enrolled in classes outside of the lecture setting such as teaching laboratories, clinics, etc. where there are potential hazards requiring students to be trained in the safe use of equipment and/or safe working practices, shall ensure, in conjunction with EHS, students complete the online lab safety training course, delivered through the BlackBoard Learning Management System (LMS) no later than the 12th class day of each long semester and no later than the first calendar week of Summer terms and inter-sessions. Failure to complete this training will result in the student being dropped from all courses associated with a laboratory function. This training is valid for one calendar year and is tracked through the BlackBoard LMS.
  • Each department who employs students to conduct work that would normally require employee safety training such as that offered through the Texas A&M University System’s TrainTraq program shall develop and or assign, in conjunction with Human Resources student-worker safety training specific to the hazard and the environment.
  • The Department identifies teaching and/or working environments and duties that require specific safety instruction and documents all student-work safety training within TrainTraq.
  • Environmental Health & Safety Department assists with identifying teaching and/or working environments and duties that require specific safety instruction with development of safety training and monitoring compliance with this procedure.

The use of the computer and computer programs are described in the labs where they are required.  Many of the programs are available to the students because of site licensing arrangements through the university.  These come with manuals, electronic help, or the students can download instructions from the web.

 

D. Maintenance and Upgrading of Facilities

There is sufficient funding for the maintenance and operation of the experimental equipment in the teaching laboratories.  Also, the electronics that support teaching in each classroom are well supported.  Money for the updating and systematic replacement of computers is also available.

Each year Higher Education Fund (HEAF) monies are made available for major equipment purchases and large maintenance and upkeep expenditures.  The Chairs in conference with the Dean decide how the HEAF monies will be expended.  The expenditures are based on perceived need rather than a blanket allocation to each department.

Additionally, the department has a machinist to provide manufacturing as needed in support of laboratory equipment and the department also has graduate student assistants to assist the lab managers with the standard installation, maintenance, and management of the labs and their equipment. 

The department has graduate student work-study webmaster to assist with the development and management of the department’s internet pages.

Each lab manager is responsible for the planning and maintenance of the equipment in their labs.  The department has a Laboratory Committee, previously chaired by Mr. Daniel S. Wright (who just retired, and has not yet been replaced), which discusses equipment needs and establishes acquisition priorities based on budgetary constraints and the needs of the department.  The committee consists of all the lab managers.  Equipment acquired as part of an externally funded project are ordered by the project managers without the need for input from the Laboratory Committee. All purchase requests pass through the department chair.

 

E. Library Services

The Jernigan Library was constructed in 1968 as a two-story building.  In 1984, a third story was added to the original building.  In 2008, approximately one-third of the third floor was renovated to create a new home for the South Texas Archives (the STA had previously been located in another building); this renovation included a new HVAC unit for half of the third floor.  In 2011 the lobby was renovated, and, in 2012, a Library Information Commons, located on the first floor, was constructed (combining a third floor computer lab that dated from 1984 and an Electronic Resource Center that had previously existed on the first floor). In 2013 and extending into early 2014, the HVAC system throughout the library was upgraded, including the addition of dehumidification throughout the building.  The library is currently in the process of expanding the Library Information Commons by installing 54 additional workstations.  In addition, all library teaching labs are being updated with new computers, AV equipment, and furniture.  Table 7-5 provides a summary of the Jernigan Library collections as of Fall 2014. 

 

Table 7-5. Summary of Information Resources in TAMUK Jernigan Library

 Collection

No. of Items

Physical Monographs, including special collections, bound serials volumes, & government documents

660,428

Audio Visual, including CD data discs

16,785

E-books & Online Documents

281,439

Microforms, including documents, serials, monographs, ERIC

426,646

Maps

8,066

Physical serial subscriptions

573

e-Journals, including publisher packages and aggregators

41,896

 

Currently there are 161 entries listed on the library’s Online Resources LibGuide (http://libguides.tamuk.edu/onlineresources1). Among databases of special interest to engineering faculty and students are Academic Search Complete, Annual Reviews, ASABE (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers) Technical Library, ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Digital Library, Cambridge Journals Online, Computer Source, CRC Handbook of Chemistry & Physics, Credo Reference, Dissertations & Theses Full-Text (ProQuest), Ebooks on EbscoHost, Engineering Village, IEEE Xplore, IOPscience, Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, MathSciNet, OnePetro, Science & Technology Collection, ScienceDirect, SciFinder, SpringerLink, Taylor & Francis Online, and Wiley Online Library.

In September 2013, the Library began setup of the Ebsco Discovery product (Javelina Discovery), which offers improved access to the many print and online resources subscribed to by the library.  This product was implemented in Spring 2014 and is now integrated into the library’s home page (http://www.tamuk.edu/library).  Javelina Discovery includes all items (excluding suppressed items) from the online catalog, plus most major online resources (principally journal information but also including over 120,000 e-books).  Javelina Discovery now allows library resources to be accessed both on and off campus in a more integrated way than previously available. 

Access to materials not held by Texas A&M University-Kingsville may also be requested through Interlibrary Loan.  For most of the last half century the library has borrowed more than it has lent, but in recent years this trend has reversed and the library now lends more than it borrows. This is almost certainly because of the enormous amount of high-end academic content now available to Jernigan Library users due to piggy-back deals licensed through Texas A&M University. 

Reference services are provided in person and online, through LibGuides created to address specific needs.  Faculty can also make requests for library instruction.  Library instruction sessions are tailored to meet the needs of a particular class.  For example, freshmen may benefit from a general introduction to where collections are housed and how to use the online catalogs, while more advanced students can attend a session on finding technical journal articles and attributing references. 

For several years, Dr. Sangsoo Lee has served as the department’s library liaison.  The library liaison makes recommendations annually for the purchase of new materials, either for the physical or electronic collections.  Through Dr. Lee, the ME program is able to request updated codes and standards and other resources as the need is perceived.

 

F. Overall Comments on Facilities

Instructors and lab mangers deliver students hazard specific safety training as appropriate to address hazards of work practices, materials to be used, within the working or learning environment prior to the student being exposed to the hazards and also manage and maintain laboratory equipment. The lab managers and teaching assistants check instructional laboratory equipment for safety concerns before the students run an experiment or use the machine, including looking for frayed wires and other possible shock hazards, checking and maintaining attachments of moving parts, and any other potential issues that may arise from students using equipment in the labs. The teaching assistants are also made aware that they should report any potentially dangerous procedures to the lab managers. General safety procedures are provided on posters in the labs to increase the students' awareness of safety.

Stephan Nix and Rose Rodriguez, Building Emergency Managers (BEM) serve as emergency contacts for all activities in Engineering Complex Building.

 

A list of the department's instructional and laboratory equipment is provided in Appendix C.

 

Appendix C – Equipment

Table C-1.  List of Equipment

Laboratory

Equipment

Engineering Measurements Lab

Air Velocity Meter & Calculator

Pneumatics Systems

Air Compressor

Weight Balance

Saybolt Viscometer

Dead Weight Pressure Calibrator

LVDT Measurement

Venturimeter

Gravimetric Bench

Gear, Pulley and Slider Crank Arrangements

3 National Instrument Elvis Stations

10 Computers

Materials Science Lab

Riehle Impact Test Machine model P1-2

New MTS Universal Testing Machine C45

TecQuipment Creep Measurement Apparatus model SM106

Budd Instruments Division Reverse Bending Fatigue Test Machine, 120 in-lb cap.

Fatigue Dynamics, Inc. Torsional Fatigue Tester model LFE150

Buehler Macromet 3 Rockwell Hardness Tester

Buehler Isomet 2000 Precision Saw

Buehler Surface Grinder

2 Buehler Bakelite Presses

5 Buehler Polishing Stations

Struers RotoPol 25 Auto Polisher

Nikon Epiphot 300 Metallurgical Microscope

4 Computers

 Keithley Multimeter/DAS units, model 2700 with Model 7708 40-Ch, Diff Mux Module w/ Automatic CJC

Centurion NDT Eddy Current Instrument model ED-530

Materials Science Lab cont.

Sony Color Video Printer

Denver Instruments Co. Digital Scale model XD-8K

Thermolyne Furnace model 48000

End-Quench test fixture

Fluids Thermal Lab

Hampden Engineering 6-Pass Heat Exchanger Demonstrator model H-6878

2 Hampden Engineering Convection Heat Transfer Demonstrator model H-6882

Hampden Engineering Conduction Heat Transfer Demonstrator model H-6860

Hampden Engineering Wind Tunnel model H-6910

Hampden Engineering Wind Tunnel model H-6910-12-CDL

GUNT Hamburg Bernoulli’s Principle Demonstrator model HM-150-07

GUNT Hamburg Measurement Equipment for Technical Hydrodynamics model HM-150-29

Water Temperature Controlled Heater

Vacuum Pump

Keithley Data Acquisition System

Manufacturing Processes Lab

3-axis Sherline table-top CNC Machine

Intelitek Super ProLight CNC Machining Center

Sherline Table-Top Lathe

8 Computers

Composites Lab

A Three-Axis Entec-CMC Filament Winder With Fiber Tensioner

33 cubic foot, 400°F Grieve Curing Oven

Self-Healing Cutting Table

Air Compressor

Vacuum Pump

Carver heated platen press w/two 12”x12” platens, heated up to 650 Fº, with a 5.5” stroke, 20 tons clamping force. 

OROS 4 Channel DAS, Instrumented Hammer, Several Accelerometers, And “Visual Modal” Software Installed On Laptop

2 Computers

SEI Lab

3500W Generator

Fisher Scientific Isotemp Model 281A Vacuum Oven

Misonix Sonicator 4000 Homogenizers

Fisher Scientific Isotemp Digital Stirring Hotplates

Thermo Scientific Hamilton Laboratory Tables       

24” Smart Podium

Robotics Lab

2 Staubli 6-DOF Robotic Manipulator

MRCP Mobile Robot

Kphera Mobile Robot

5 Computers

Controls Lab

Heat Flow Chamber

3 Power Supplies

Unmanned Vehicles (Helicopter, Quadcopter)

Eagle Tree OSD Pro Pkg with 100A eLogger/Integrated Connectors and GPS

DragonLink V2 Complete Long Range RC System(Tx&Rx 433MHz)

Twin OBSERVER Helicopter w/ 52cc Twin Engine

Kondo KHR-2HV Humanoid Robot Kit

Dynamixel MX-64T and Dynamixel MX-28T

Inverted Pendulum Experiment

5 Quanser Data Acquisition Boards

Servo Motor Setup

Torsional Plant Setup

Oscilloscope

National Instruments Elvis Stations

Water Level Control Setup

Light Source Following Antenna System

Sun Workstation For Graphics

5 Computers w/ Wincon DAQ Software

Machine Shop

2 Milling Machines

6 Lathe

2 Drill Presses

2 Band Saws

Reciprocating Saw

Surface Grinder

Shaper

Arc Welder

Cutting Torch

Belt Sander

Hydraulic Press

Sustainability and Simulation Laboratory

This page was last updated on: August 5, 2016