News & Events

Undergraduate Research Presentation Luncheon 10/16/2017

Congratulations to our students who presented their research at the Undergraduate Research Presentation Luncheon on October 16, 2017.

  • Roxana Castellanos, an undergraduate psychology major from Mercedes (McNair Scholar) described her research on The Effects of Individual Differences in Psychological Reactance:  Acceptance or Backfire When Receiving Contrary Information.
  • Mirelvia Amaro, an undergraduate psychology major from Brownsville (President’s Undergraduate Research Program) study was entitled Investigation of the Bilingual Advantage and its Cognitive Enhancements (Dr. Byrd, Faculty Mentor).

In addition T-CUR Grant recipients were invited to display posters of their research. Isabel Mata and Christina Lopez presented a poster describing their research entitled The Influence of Parenting on Gender Differences in Moral Decision Making. (Dr. Miller, Faculty Mentor).

Reiser-Robbins awarded the Daniel E. Kilgore Award from the Nueces County Historical Society

Dr. Christine Reiser-Robbins, Assistant Professor of Anthropology has received the Daniel E. Kilgore Award from the Nueces County Historical Society. The award was established in 2004 in memory of Mr. Kilgore for the purpose of "recognizing meritorious service to the NCHS and/or for the promotion and preservation of local and regional history." Her husband Mark was a co-recipient. The Historical Society indicated that it was the first time they had ever presented the award to a husband-and-wife team.

College of Arts & Sciences Faculty & Staff Awards Reception

The following honorees were recognized for their outstanding contributions to the college & university at the John E. Conner Museum Thursday, April 27, 2017.

William J. Hall Faculty Award
Dr. Donald W. Daughtry, Department of Psychology & Sociology

Dean’s Award for Outstanding Scholarly & Creative Production
Dr. Richard Miller, Department of Psychology & Sociology

Dean’s Staff Excellence Award
Ms. Lisa Martinez, Department of Psychology & Sociology

Faculty Scholarship – Publications this Summer

 Dr. Kwon published the following three articles: 

  •  “Market Transition, Social Stratification, and Health Disparities in China: A Longitudinal Analysis, 1991–2006” in Social Forces.

  • “Economic Segmentation and Health Inequalities in Urban Post-Reform China” in AIMS Public Health

  • “Regional Variations in Health Disparities: A cross-regional comparison of self-rated health determinants in reform-era China” in the Journal of Social Sciences Research .

Dr. Chen published the following two articles: 

  • “Socioeconomic Statuses across Generations and Co-residence in China” in The Journal of Chinese Sociology.

  •  “Parent-Child Socioeconomic Statuses and Coresidence: An Analysis of Living Arrangements    in China” in Sociological Studies.

  • “Family Structure and Migration Intention of Rural Residents in Western China.” Journal of  Northwestern Agriculture and Forestry University (Social Sciences Edition)

Ms. Altamirano published the following article:

  •  “Tribal Poverty and the Politics of Land Use:  A Case Study on Cultural Affinity in Oklahoma” in International Political Anthropology

 Dr. Miller published the following two book chapters: 

  • “Promoting Student Engagement in the Classroom and Beyond.” In C. Wankel & L. Wankel (Eds.) Integrating Curricular and Co-curricular Endeavors to Enhance Student Outcomes, (pp. 393-416). Bradford, UK: Emerald Group Publishing.

  • “Applying social psychology to the environment.” In Baumeister, R., & Bushman, B. Social psychology and human nature (4th ed.), (pp. E1-E18). Belmont, CA: Cengage. 

2016 Faculty Mentor Award - Rocky Mountain Psychological Association

Dr. Rick Miller received the 2016 Faculty Mentor Award from the President of the Rocky Mountain Psychological Association. The selection committee noted that: “Mentorship, particularly of teaching, scholarship, and the scholarship of teaching and learning, is not just what Professor does but who he is.  His decades of mentoring others and shaping mentees as well as their students have crated a monumental legacy that continues to impact RMPA and will reach far into the future.”

Congratulations to our award winning faculty.

 Dr. Christine Reiser-Robbins has been named a “Bringer of Light” by the campus group Servants of Las Luminarias. The Servants of Las Luminarias is an anonymous collection of campus community members who select those that they feel are “bringers of the light of the knowledge of goodness to the Texas A&M University-Kingsville campus community.” As an honoree, Christine received a large ceramic ornamental candle holder (luminaria), a lovely flowering plant, and a framed certificate of recognition. The certificate states that Christine has, through word and deed, “selflessly and consistently shone the light of goodness into our midst.”

Dr. Joseph Domino has been selected for the Dean’s Award for Outstanding Teaching. The College of Arts & Sciences recognizes teaching as the key element for achieving the strategic vision for the college. In support of this recognition, each year the College presents an award for a faculty member who has shown excellence in teaching and effective pedagogy for the current academic year. This includes activities that advance students to successful completion of their degrees and personal and professional growth.

Dr. Colin Wark was selected for the Dean’s Award for Outstanding Scholarly and Creative Production. The College of Arts & Sciences recognizes the scholarly and creative production of its faculty members, and the value that it adds to the institution. In support of this recognition, each year the College will annually present an award for a faculty member who has shown excellence in the areas of scholarly and creative production during the current academic year.

The Dean’s Award for Outstanding Leadership recognizes a faculty member who has provided extraordinary leadership contributions that advance the excellence of the department, college, and/or the university. This award is given to a faculty member who has demonstrated exceptional abilities to lead, serve, inspire and collaborate with broad impact. This year, Dr. Rick Miller was selected to receive this award.



 

Texas A&M System-wide Pathways Conference  2015

Our department was well represented at the 2015 Texas A&M System-wide Pathways Conference.  Of the eleven TAMUK poster presentations in the Humanities and Social Sciences, 7 were from our department.  Of the three oral presentations from TAMUK, Cassie Gonzales, psychology major, was the only undergraduate to present. One of our students, Nathaniel Marino received the 2nd Place Award for undergraduate social science research. Congratulations to our outstanding students.

Nathaniel Marino

Why Do We Believe? Locus Of Control As A Predictor Of Religious Belief
Dr. Miller, faculty mentor

Anthony Martinez

EEG And Behavioral Evidence Of Different Cognitive Processing Of Hedonic And Utilitarian Stimuli During Online Shopping
Dr. Byrd, faculty mentor



Meghan Milecky

Campus Rape Prevention: Characteristics, Causes And Widespread Adoption
Dr. Han, faculty mentor

Joseph Soza and Dylan Dimock

Detection Of Inaccurate Information In Semantic Illusions Using Eye-Tracking Technology
Dr. Hannon, faculty mentor

Iris Rivera

Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) Usage To Determine Differences In Mental Effort Between Overt And Covert Modes Of The Tower Of London Problem Solving Task
Dr. Byrd and Ms. Sherman, faculty mentors

Cassandra Gonzales

Exploring The Bilingual Advantage On Selective Inhibition: EEG And Behavioral Indices
Dr. Byrd, faculty mentor

April Gonzalez

Examining The Relationships Between Beginning Readers’ Reading Habits And Performance On Multiple-Choice Questions Using Eye-Tracking Technology
Dr. Hannon, faculty mentor

Michelle Hernandez

Using Eye-Tracking Technology To Examine Beginning Readers’ Patterns On Multiple-Choice Questions
Dr. Hannon, faculty mentor

(07/08/2014)

Congratulations to Dr. Brenda Hannon, Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology, Sociology, and Criminology who has just been awarded $410,000.00 + four-year grant from the National Institute of Health to study illiteracy. To date, although numerous studies suggest that inefficient word decoding skills are a source of poor reading and illiteracy it is clear that even if children do have efficient word identification - decoding skills they can still score poorly on assessments of reading because of weak or inefficient processes that are used for comprehending text. The goal of Dr. Hannon’s research is to assess both work - level and comprehension processes in preschoolers and then determine whether these assessments predict their future reading performance (i.e., when children are 7-8 years old). The results of the present study will provide a strong foundation of knowledge for identifying potential problems in reading comprehension before a child begins to read. Moreover, such knowledge should allow us to reduce illiteracy because it can be used to create intervention programs that foster the development of comprehension processes in pre-and beginning readers (identification intervention).
Dr. Hannon is currently looking for children to participate in her study!! If you have a child or children who are 4.5 to 6 years old and have no learning disabilities she would love to have them participate in her study. The child will receive a $15.00 gift package for completing the 2.25 hour study. Please contact her at Brenda.hannon@tamuk.edu and leave your name and phone number. She will answer all of your questions.

This page was last updated on: October 17, 2017