Texas A&M University-Kingsville

Courses

1000-level        2000-level        3000-level        4000-level

PHYSICS (PHYS) 1000-level Courses

1101. College Physics I Laboratory.(PHYS 1101) 1(0-4)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1301.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 1301.

1102. College Physics II Laboratory. (PHYS 1102) 1(0-4)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1302.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 1302.

1103. Stars and Galaxies Laboratory. (PHYS 1103) 1(0-3)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1303.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 1303.

1104. Solar System Laboratory. (PHYS 1104) 1(0-3)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1304.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 1304.

1301. College Physics I. (PHYS 1301 or PHYS 1401) 3(3-0)
A trigonometry-based introduction to physics. Topics include kinematics, vector analysis, force dynamics, equilibrium, work, energy, momentum, collisions, fluid dynamics and thermal physics. Prior knowledge of physics (one year of high school physics; otherwise PHYS 1373 is recommended) is assumed.
Prerequisites: MATH 1314 and MATH 1316. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1101 is recommended.

1302. College Physics II. (PHYS 1302 or PHYS 1402) 3(3-0)
A continuation of PHYS 1301. Topics include periodic motion, sound, electric force, electric current, resistance, electric circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, AC circuits, light and optics.
Prerequisite: PHYS 1301 and PHYS 1101. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1102 is recommended.

1303. Stars and Galaxies. (PHYS 1303, PHYS 1403) 3(3-0)
A survey of stellar astronomy and cosmology. Topics include the behavior of light; the sun as a star; positions, motions and brightness of the stars; stellar evolution; the Milky Way and other galaxies; and cosmology. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1103 is recommended.

1304. Solar System. (PHYS 1304 or PHYS 1404) 3(3-0)
A survey of the astronomy of our solar system. Topics include the history of astronomy, naked-eye phenomena, telescopes, gravity and orbits and the nature and history of the Earth, moon, planets, asteroids and comets. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1104 is recommended.

1373. Preparatory Physics. 3(3-0)
Topics needed to succeed in College Physics or University Physics. Problem solving using basic techniques of algebra and trigonometry. Topics include vector mechanics, linear and two-dimensional kinematics and Newtonian dynamics.

1375. Physics. 3(3-2)
A survey of the most basic concepts of physics. Topics include scientific measurements, motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, matter, heat, electricity, magnetism, sound, light, atomic structure and nuclear energy.
Prerequisite: MATH 1314.

1471. The Acoustical Foundations of Music. 4(3-2)
A general introduction and survey of the physical and acoustical foundations of music. Topics include the fundamental physics relevant to music, the reception of musical sound, intervals, scales, tuning, temperament, auditorium and room acoustics and the production of sounds by musical instruments including electronic.

PHYSICS (PHYS) 2000-level Courses

2125. University Physics I Laboratory. (PHYS 2125) 1(0-4)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2325.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 2325.

2126. University Physics II Laboratory. (PHYS 2126) 1(0-4)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2326.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 2326.

2325. University Physics I. (PHYS 2325 or PHYS 2425) 3(3-0)
A calculus-based introduction to physics. Topics include kinematics, vector analysis, force dynamics, equilibrium, work, energy, momentum, collisions, fluid dynamics and thermal physics. Prior knowledge of physics (one year of high school physics; otherwise PHYS 1373 is recommended) is assumed.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in MATH 2413 or equivalent. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2125 is recommended.

2326. University Physics II. (PHYS 2326 or PHYS 2426) 3(3-0)
A continuation of PHYS 2325. Topics include periodic motion, sound, electric force, electric current, resistance, electric circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, light, optics and modern physics.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2325 and PHYS 2125 or PHYS 1302 and PHYS 1102; credit or registration in MATH 2414 or equivalent [MATH 2314]. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2126 is recommended.

PHYSICS (PHYS) 3000-level Courses

3310. Advanced Laboratory. 3(1-4)
A laboratory course focusing on advanced techniques and experiments drawn from the full range of physics classes. The student will understand the role of experimental design, advanced data analysis and reduction, and the use of computers while investigating physical phenomena.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 3343.

3313. Mechanics I.3(3-0)
A mathematical treatment of the fundamentals of classical mechanics. Topics include particle dynamics in one, two and three dimensions; conservation laws; dynamics of a system of particles; motion of rigid bodies; central force problems; accelerating coordinate systems; gravitation; Lagrange's equations and Hamilton's equations.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326/PHYS 2126; credit or registration in either MATH 3320 or MATH 3415.

3323. Electromagnetic Field Theory. 3(3-0)
Electrostatics; Laplace’s Equation; the theory of dielectrics; magnetostatics; electromagnetic induction; magnetic fields of currents; Maxwell's equations.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326/PHYS 2126; credit or registration in MATH 3320 or MATH 3415 or equivalent.

3333. Thermodynamics. 3(3-0)
Equations of state, ideal gases, first and second laws of thermodynamics, entropy, and statistical methods.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 and PHYS 2126; credit or registration in MATH 3415 or equivalent.

3343. Modern Physics I. 3(3-0)
Introduction to special relativity and elementary quantum mechanics. Topics include space-time, relativistic energy and momentum, the uncertainty principle, Schrödinger's equation, observables and operators, bound states, potential barriers and the hydrogen atom.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 and PHYS 2126; credit or registration in either MATH 3320 or MATH 3415 or equivalent.

PHYSICS (PHYS) 4000-level Courses

4160. Nuclear Physics Laboratory. 1(0-4)
Laboratory study of natural and artificial radioactivity and particle physics. Particle physics detectors, such as Geiger-Müller, sodium-iodide, plastic scintillation and solid state detectors. Detector resolution, radioactive half-life, muon lifetime, energy of particles and gamma rays and coincidence measurements.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 4360.

4191. Physics Research Project. 1(1-0)
Literature survey and preparation for, and initiation of, a research project agreed to between the student and a faculty advisor, to be completed and reported on in the Research Seminar course.
Prerequisite: PHYS 3343.

4192. Physics Research Seminar. 1(1-0)
An experimental or theoretical project, begun in the Research Project course, will be concluded by the student and the results reported in a seminar. Students who have not yet taken the ETC major field test in physics are required to do so while enrolled in Seminar.
Prerequisite: PHYS 4191.

4303. Mathematical Methods of Physicists and Engineers. 3(3-0)
Mathematical techniques from the following areas: infinite series, integral transforming, applications of complex variables, vectors, matrices and tensors, special functions, partial differential equations, Green's functions, perturbation theory, integral equations, calculus of variations and groups and group representations.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in MATH 3320.

4323. Optics. 3(3-0)
A mathematical treatment of the modern theory of optics. Topics include Huygen's principle as applied to geometric optics, interference, diffraction, polarization, crystal optics, electromagnetic theory of light, the interaction of light with matter and quantum optics.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3323; MATH 3415 or MATH 3320.

4343. Modern Physics II. 3(3-0)
Continuation of Modern Physics I. Topics include atomic, molecular, nuclear, statistical, solid state, laser and elementary particle physics.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3343; MATH 3415 or MATH 3320.

4353. Quantum Physics. 3(3-0)
The Schrödinger equation; one dimensional systems; the Heisenberg uncertainty principle; magnetic moments and angular momentum; two and three dimensional systems; approximation methods; scattering theory.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3343; credit or registration in either MATH 3320 or MATH 3415 or equivalent.

4360. (Formerly PHYS 4460.) Nuclear Physics. 3(3-0)
Study of nuclear phenomena and properties including mass, stability, magnetic moment, radioactive decay processes and nuclear reactions. The application of nuclear principles to other fields such as astronomy, engineering, manufacturing and medicine.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3343; credit or registration in both PHYS 4353 and either MATH 3320 or MATH 3415.

4370. Geophysics. 3(3-0)
Fundamentals of the mechanics of geophysics. Study of the instruments and methods used in geophysical exploration.
Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of advanced physics and/or engineering.

4383. Computational Physics. 3(3-0)
An introduction to the methods and algorithms used in solving physical problems with computers, and computer-related limitations on such solutions.
Prerequisites: knowledge of the C programming language; credit or registration in MATH 3320 or MATH 3415.

4390. Selected Topics in Modern Physics. 3(3-0)
A detailed study of one or more important physical discoveries, developments and/or theories. Course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: senior standing.

This page was last updated on: October 14, 2014