Texas A&M University-Kingsville

Courses

1000-level        2000-level        3000-level        4000-level

PHYSICS (PHYS) 1000-level Courses

1101. College Physics I Laboratory. 1(0-4)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1301.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 1301. Laboratory fee, $5.

1102. College Physics II Laboratory. 1(0-4)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1302.
Prerequisite: PHYS 1302. Laboratory fee, $5.

1103. Stars and Galaxies Laboratory. (Formerly PHYS 1112.) 1(0-3)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1303.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 1303. Laboratory fee, $5.

1104. Solar System Laboratory. (Formerly PHYS 1111.) 1(0-3)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1304.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 1304. Laboratory fee, $5.

1105. Elementary Physics I Laboratory.  1(0-2)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1305.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 1305. Laboratory fee, $5.

1107. Elementary Physics II Laboratory. 1(0-2)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1307.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 1307. Laboratory fee, $5.

1170.  Principles of Nuclear Engineering. 1(1-0)
Introduction to nuclear engineering including global and national energy requirements, radioactivity, radiation protection, and fission and fusion reactor concepts.

1301. College Physics I. 3(3-0)
A trigonometry-based introduction to physics. Topics include kinematics, vector analysis, force dynamics, equilibrium, work, energy, momentum, collisions, fluid dynamics, and thermal physics.
Prerequisites: MATH 1314, MATH 1316, and one year of high school physics or PHYS 1305 and PHYS 1105.
Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1101 is recommended.

1302. College Physics II.3(3-0)
A continuation of Physics I. Topics include periodic motion, sound, electric force, electric current, resistance, electric circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, AC circuits, light, and optics.
Prerequisites: PHYS 1301 and PHYS 1101.
Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1102 is recommended.

1303. Stars and Galaxies. (Formerly PHYS 1312.) 3(3-0)
A survey of stellar astronomy and cosmology. Topics include the behavior of light; the sun as a star; positions, motions, and brightness of the stars; stellar evolution; the Milky Way and other galaxies; and cosmology.
Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1103 is recommended.

1304. Solar System. (Formerly PHYS 1311.) 3(3-0)
A survey of the astronomy of our solar system. Topics include the history of astronomy, naked-eye phenomena, telescopes, gravity and orbits, and the nature and history of the Earth, moon, planets, asteroids, and comets.
Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1104 is recommended.

1305. Elementary Physics I.3(3-0)
A qualitative introduction to physics for students with little preparation in the physical sciences. Topics include kinematics, vector analysis, force dynamics, equilibrium, work, energy, momentum, collisions, fluid dynamics, and thermal physics.
Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1105 is recommended.

1307. Elementary Physics II.3(3-0)
A qualitative introduction to physics for students with little preparation in the physical sciences. Topics include periodic motion, sound, electric force, electric current, resistance, electric circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, AC circuits, light, optics, and modern physics.
Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1107 is recommended. 

1375. Physics. 3(3-2)
A survey of the most basic topics in physics. Topics include scientific measurements, motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, matter, heat, electricity, magnetism, sound, light, atomic structure and nuclear energy.
Prerequisite: MATH 1314. Laboratory fee, $5.

1471. The Acoustical Foundations of Music. 4(3-2)
A general introduction and survey of the physical and acoustical foundations of music.  Topics include the fundamental physics relevant to music, the reception of musical sound, intervals, scales, tuning, temperament, auditorium and room acoustics and the production of sounds by musical instruments including electronic. Laboratory fee, $5.

PHYSICS (PHYS) 2000-level Courses

2125. University Physics I Laboratory. 1(0-4)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2325.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 2325. Laboratory fee, $5.

2126. University Physics II Laboratory. 1(0-4)
A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2326.
Prerequisite: credit or registration in PHYS 2326. Laboratory fee, $5.

2325. University Physics I. 3(3-0)
A calculus-based introduction to physics. Topics include: kinematics, vector analysis, force dynamics, equilibrium, work, energy, momentum, collisions, fluid dynamics and thermal physics.
Prerequisites: one year of high school physics or PHYS 1305 and PHYS 1105; credit or registration in MATH 2413 or equivalent.
Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2125 is recommended.

2326. University Physics II. 3(3-0)
A continuation of PHYS 2325. Topics include periodic motion, sound, electric force, electric current, resistance, electric circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, light, optics and modern physics.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2325 and PHYS 2125 or PHYS 1302 and PHYS 1102; credit or registration in MATH 2414 or equivalent.
Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2126 is recommended.

PHYSICS (PHYS) 3000-level Courses

3310. Advanced Laboratory. 1(1-3)
A laboratory course focusing on advanced techniques and experiments. Experiments will be drawn from the full range of physics classes. The student will understand the role of experimental design, advanced data analysis and reduction, and the use of computers while investigating physical phenomena.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2126, PHYS 2326.

3313. Mechanics. 3(3-0)
A mathematical treatment of the fundamentals of classical mechanics. Topics include particle dynamics in one, two and three dimensions; conservation laws; dynamics of a system of particles; motion of rigid bodies; central force problems; central force problems; accelerating coordinate systems; gravitation; Lagrange’s equations and Hamilton’s equations.
Prerequisites:  PHYS 1301/1101 or PHYS 2325/2125;MATH 2414.

3323. Electromagnetic Field Theory. 3(3-0)
A mathematical treatment of the fundamentals of classical electromagnetic theory. Topics include electrostatics and electrodynamics, vector calculus, theory of dielectrics, magnetostatic fields, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields of currents and Maxwell's equations.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 and 2126; credit or registration in MATH 3320 or MATH 3415 or equivalent.

3333. Thermodynamics. 3(3-0)
A mathematical treatment of the fundamentals of thermal physics. Topics include the concept of temperature, equations of state, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, entropy, change of phase and thermodynamic functions.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 and 2126; credit or registration in MATH 3415 or equivalent.

3343. Modern Physics I. 3(3-0)
A course in special relativity and elementary quantum mechanics. Topics include space-time, relativistic energy and momentum, the uncertainty principle, Schrödinger's equation, observables and operators, bound states, potential barriers and the hydrogen atom.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 and 2126; credit or registration in MATH 3320 or MATH 3415 or equivalent.

3362. Introduction to Nuclear Engineering. 3(3-0)
Basic radioactivity, nuclear and neutron physics as applied to nuclear engineering.
Prerequisite: PHYS 3343; credit or registration in CSEN 2304 or equivalent; MATH 3320.

PHYSICS (PHYS) 4000-level Courses

4191. Research in Physics. 1(1-0)
Supervised research into advanced physics concepts. Includes, but is not limited to, literature searches. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Approval by the supervising faculty.

4303. Mathematical Methods of Physics. 3(3-0)
A course presenting mathematical techniques used in physics and engineering. The course will survey, at brief introductory level and from a physics-oriented perspective, numerous mathematical techniques from areas such as infinite series, integral transforming, applications of complex variables, matrices and tensors, special functions, partial differential equations, Green’s functions, perturbation theory, integral equations, calculus of variations and groups and group representations.
Prerequisites: MATH 3415 or MATH 3320; 3 hours of advanced physics.

4323. Optics. 3(3-0)
A mathematical treatment of the modern theory of optics. Topics include Huygen’s principle as applied to geometric optics, interference, diffraction, polarization, crystal optics, electromagnetic theory of light, the interaction of light with matter and quantum optics.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3323; MATH 3415 or MATH 3320.

4343. Modern Physics II. 3(3-0)
A continuation of Modern Physics I. Topics include atomic, molecular, nuclear, statistical, solid state, laser and elementary particle physics.
Prerequisites: PHYS 3343; MATH 3415 or MATH 3320.

4353. Quantum Theory. 3(3-0)
A mathematical treatment of quantized physical phenomena. Topics include the wave theory of matter, the principle of superstition, probability, expectation values, coordinate representation, momentum representation, indeterminacy, Hermitian operators, angular momentum and spin. Quantum solutions for simple barriers, potential wells, the harmonic oscillator and the hydrogen atom are presented. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 3343; MATH 3415 and MATH 3320.

4362. Radiological Safety. 3(3-0)
Interactions of nuclear radiations with matter and biological systems. Theory and practice of radiation dosimetry as applied to radiation protection. Design and application of radiation dosimetry systems for personnel monitoring, area radiation monitoring and accident situations. Includes external and internal dosimetry as well as long-term risk analysis.
Prerequisite: PHYS 3362.

4363. Environmental Nuclear Engineering. 3(3-0)
Environmental aspects of nuclear power. Natural radiation environment and the distribution of radioactivity added to the environment by human activities. Evaluation of effects of radiation and radioactivity on the environment and on humans.
Prerequisite: PHYS 4362.

4364. Radiation Protection Engineering. 3(3-0)
Analysis of radiation hazard situations and design of nuclear facilities from a safety standpoint. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 4362.

4370. Geophysics. 3(3-0)
Fundamentals of the mechanics of geophysics. Study of the instruments and methods used in geophysical exploration.
Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of advanced physics and/or engineering.

4383. Computational Physics. 3(3-0)
An introduction to the methods and algorithms used in solving physical problems with computers, and computer-related limitations on such solutions.
Prerequisites: Knowledge of the C programming language; credit or registration in MATH 3415 or 3320.

4390. Selected Topics in Modern Physics. 3(3-0)
A detailed study of one or more important physical discoveries, developments and/or theories.
Course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: senior standing.

4391. Research Projects in Physics. V:1-3
Supervised research involving advanced physics concepts. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours. Includes, but is not limited to, literature searches, experimental techniques and theoretical tools; enrollment for only a literature-search project is limited to 1 hour credit.
Prerequisites: Two advanced Physics courses and approval by the supervising faculty.

43XX. [continued use of 4391 requested] Research Projects in Physics. 3(3-0)
Supervised research involving advanced physics concepts. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours. Includes, but is not limited to, experimental techniques and/or theoretical tools.
Prerequisites: Two advanced Physics courses and approval by the supervising faculty.

4460. Nuclear Physics. 4(3-4)
A study of natural and artificial radioactivity. Topics include the neutron, the positron, nuclear structure and forces, binding energies, nuclear fission and fusion, particle accelerations and cosmic rays.
Prerequisite: PHYS 3343. Laboratory fee, $5.



This page was last updated on: October 30, 2013